Arsenic Found in Tap Water

April 17, 2007

Flouride used in our tap water has been found by the National Sanitation Foundation to also contain arsenic at a concentration of 0.43 and 1.66 parts per billion.

Although concentrations as low as 1ppm can increase a person’s risk of bladder and lung cancer, the EPA has set the maximum level at 10ppb.

Is flouridation necessary?

“We’re glad the CDC finally admits that arsenic can be found in fluoridation chemicals. But the CDC should go further and list all undesirable chemicals and impurities allowed in the fluoridation chemicals, and make it publicly known so consumers truly can make an informed choice.” – Paul Beeber, president of the New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation

Statements and opinions by Mike Adams, executive director of the Consumer Wellness Center, supplied by News Target:

• The practice of fluoridating public water supplies is nothing more than a clever way to dispose of industrial waste chemicals by feeding them to the population rather than paying for proper hazardous waste disposal.

• There are absolutely no dental or medical benefits whatsoever derived from the ingestion of fluorosilicic acid. Pro-fluoride propagandists try to confuse the public into thinking that fluorosilicic acid is the same as natural fluoride, but it isn’t. FSA is an EPA-regulated toxic waste chemical that should never be dripped into public water supplies unless, of course, you’re a terrorist trying to poison the population. In that scenario, FSA is quite effective at harming large numbers of people.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: